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Information for Adults

Screen All Adults

You can help to reduce falls among adults.  Screening is the first step in detecting those at risk and reducing falls and the major injuries that can result from falling.  Screening adults is easy and manageable to do, just by asking the right questions.

Professionals and volunteers should ask the following three questions of any adult on a regular basis.  These three questions have been found to have strong value in predicting falls.

When you complete the screening, here are your next steps:
Response Action
No falls

No further assessment or referral is needed.

Encourage adult to exercise daily.

Encourage adult to take action and prevent a fall

Yes - Single fall

Recommend visit to primary care provider for falls assessment and treatment of risk factors.

Primary care provider will assess for gait and/or balance problems. The Timed Get Up and Go can be used to identify gait and/or balance problems. Adults who demonstrate no difficultly or unsteadiness need no further assessment. Those who have difficulty or unsteadiness require further assessment.

Encourage adult to take action and prevent a fall
Yes - Multiple falls and/or Impairment of gait and/or balance

Recommend visit to primary care provider for falls assessment and treatment of risk factors.

Assessment should be performed by professional with appropriate skills and experience.

Encourage adult to take action and prevent a fall

Yes - Fear of falling

Recommend visit to primary care provider to discuss fear of falling.

Encourage adult to take action and prevent a fall

Attend A Matter of Balance class

Adults who have had one or more falls, or have impairment of gait and/or balance should undergo a multifactorial assessment.

The information provided on this page is based upon the guidelines set forth by the American Geriatrics Society (AGS) Panel on Falls in Older Persons.